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10 Moleskine Journals From Some Of The Most Interesting Creatives Alive

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Despite the ever-encroaching digital world, the popularity of Moleskine, those utterly dignified black notebooks that can be carried in your pocket, seems to only have increased. The many 20th-century cultural heroes who carried Moleskines, from Oscar Wilde to Pablo Picasso, have lent the brand an aura of creative genius.

But this winter, Moleskine is bolstering its 21st-century cred with the publication of The Detour Book, a collection of the creative journals of present-day artists, designers, and writers. Noted by Brain Pickings’ Maria Popova last week, The Detour Book sounds like one of those tomes that deserves to be poured over:

Scattered across the pages of The Detour Book are the images of over 250 notebooks decorated, hacked, and filled with intimate sketches and drawings by some of the world’s most celebrated creative professionals; among them architects, designers, film directors and musicians including Spike Jonze, Sigur Ros, Mary Ellen Mark and Karim Rashid, to name a few.

There are funny little cartoons from Dave Eggers and brilliant sketches from Toyo Ito, which show the Mikimoto building taking over Ginza. Each book is its own unique archive, preserving the struggle to bring a spark of an idea to fruition.

What’s interesting about the collection is that most people don’t use Moleskines as traditional sketchbooks at all. Instead, designers like Tord Boontje have used them as 3-D objects, slicing through their eggshell pages and hacking them into study models. ATELYE 70, the Turkish architecture studio, turned the fold-out pages of a Moleskine Pocket Accordion into an actual architectural model, inserting plexiglass staircases and scale models between the folds.  http://bit.ly/V8wi6W

 

The Detour Book is one of those rare pieces of marketing that rewards a company and the consumer equally. It’s marvelously fun reading. And who can blame Moleskine for being proud?  Buy your copy here

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Light Drawings — photographs of Pablo Picasso by Gjon Mili, 1949

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It would be very curious to record by means of photographs, not the stage of the picture, but its metamorphoses  —Pablo Picasso

When LIFE magazine’s Gjon Mili, a technical prodigy and lighting innovator, visited Pablo Picasso in the South of France in 1949, it was clear that the meeting of these two artists and craftsmen was bound to result in something extraordinary. Mili showed Picasso some of his photographs of ice skaters with tiny lights affixed to their skates, jumping in the dark — and the Spanish genius’s lively, ever-stirring mind began to race.

“Picasso” LIFE magazine reported at the time, “gave Mili 15 minutes to try one experiment. He was so fascinated by the result that he posed for five sessions, projecting 30 drawings of centaurs, bulls, Greek profiles and his signature. Mili took his photographs in a darkened room, using two cameras, one for side view, another for front view. By leaving the shutters open, he caught the light streaks swirling through space.”

This series of photographs, known ever since as Picasso’s “light drawings,” were made with a small electric light in a darkened room; in effect, the images vanished as soon as they were created — and yet they still live, six decades later, in Mili’s playful, hypnotic images. Many of them were also put on display in early 1950 in a show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Finally, while the “Picasso draws a centaur in the air” photo that leads off this gallery is rightly celebrated, many of the images in this gallery are far less well-known — in fact, many of them never ran in the magazine — but they are no less thrilling, after all these years, than the iconic picture of the archetypal creative genius of the 20th century crafting, on the fly, a fleeting (albeit captured forever on film) work of art.

source: http://life.time.com/culture/picasso-draws-with-light-1949/

NEVER FOREVER NEVER FOR NOW ↓

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Ephemeral Ink on Skin drawings by Pinpin Co

 

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Pinpin Co, a Chinese artist raised in Japan, creates intricately detailed and somewhat disturbing skin drawings. Using just a 0.38mm gel ink pen, Pinpin spends about 5 hours on each subject, understanding them as human beings and creating an ephemeral artwork that often captures physical or mental scars that the subject possesses. “It often becomes a therapeutic process,” she says in an interview, describing how the relationship between her subjects can take on that of doctor and patient. It’s now wonder that her drawings often take on a grotesqueness that resembles blood veins.

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Pinpin also divulges into how her art can be a healing process for herself too. She recently decided to draw on her father, who she had lived apart from her whole life. “Coming in contact with a stranger’s skin and a family member’s skin are two completely different experiences,” she says. During the span of 1 month, Pinpin commuted to Aomori to visit her father, slowly re-establishing a relationship, which resulted in what is perhaps one of her most compelling images.

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Pinpin’s Ink on Skin series is on display at BankART Studio NYK in Yokohama from July 6 – July 26, 2012.

 

“The Landing” – Paintings by Michael Peck

Realistic painting with a slight touch of surrealism is Michael Pecks preferred form of artistic expression, with children being the Australian painter’s inexhaustible source of inspiration.

His last exhibition, called “The Landing” exposes all the horrors of the 2nd world war through the eyes of a child. Its main theme was the relationship between Michael and his grandfathers, both of whom fought in the war.

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IdN™ Books® — IdN Extra 07: Infographics

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IdN™ Books® — IdN Extra 07: Infographics

IdN Extra 07: Infographics

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Children’s Manuscript // by Gertrude Stein

Writer, poet and art collector Gertrude Stein is one of the most beloved — and quoted — luminaries of the early 20th century. In 1938, author Margaret Wise Brown of the freshly founded Young Scott Books became obsessed with convincing leading adult authors to try their hands at a children’s book. She sent letters to Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Gertrude Stein. Hemingway and Steinbeck expressed no interest, but Stein surprised Brown by saying she already had a near-complete children’s manuscript titled The World Is Round, and would be happy to have Young Scott bring it to life. Which they did, though not without drama. Stein demanded that the pages be pink, the ink blue, and the artwork by illustrator Francis Rose. Young Scott were able to meet the first two demands despite the technical difficulties, but they didn’t want Rose to illustrate the book and asked Stein to instead choose from several Young Scott illustrators. Reluctantly, she settle don Clement Hurd, whose first illustrated book had appeared just that year. The World Is Round was eventually published, featuring a mix of unpunctuated prose and poetry, with a single illustration for each chapter. The original release included a special edition of 350 slipcase copies autographed by Stein and Hurd.