messerwerferin

sich damenhaft benehmen.


Leave a comment

2012 BROOKLYN STREET ART IMAGES OF THE YEAR

Of the 10,000 images he snapped over 2012, BSA photographer Jaime Rojo selects to present the 110 best works on the street to represent this years most compelling, interesting, perplexing, and thrilling works of art.

This slideshow is a great display of Brooklyn’s range of mediums, techniques, styles, and sentiments that appear on the street today – and as the scene continues to evolve worldwide.

 

Light Drawings — photographs of Pablo Picasso by Gjon Mili, 1949

Leave a comment

It would be very curious to record by means of photographs, not the stage of the picture, but its metamorphoses  —Pablo Picasso

When LIFE magazine’s Gjon Mili, a technical prodigy and lighting innovator, visited Pablo Picasso in the South of France in 1949, it was clear that the meeting of these two artists and craftsmen was bound to result in something extraordinary. Mili showed Picasso some of his photographs of ice skaters with tiny lights affixed to their skates, jumping in the dark — and the Spanish genius’s lively, ever-stirring mind began to race.

“Picasso” LIFE magazine reported at the time, “gave Mili 15 minutes to try one experiment. He was so fascinated by the result that he posed for five sessions, projecting 30 drawings of centaurs, bulls, Greek profiles and his signature. Mili took his photographs in a darkened room, using two cameras, one for side view, another for front view. By leaving the shutters open, he caught the light streaks swirling through space.”

This series of photographs, known ever since as Picasso’s “light drawings,” were made with a small electric light in a darkened room; in effect, the images vanished as soon as they were created — and yet they still live, six decades later, in Mili’s playful, hypnotic images. Many of them were also put on display in early 1950 in a show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Finally, while the “Picasso draws a centaur in the air” photo that leads off this gallery is rightly celebrated, many of the images in this gallery are far less well-known — in fact, many of them never ran in the magazine — but they are no less thrilling, after all these years, than the iconic picture of the archetypal creative genius of the 20th century crafting, on the fly, a fleeting (albeit captured forever on film) work of art.

source: http://life.time.com/culture/picasso-draws-with-light-1949/

brooklyn graffiti artist DAIN

1 Comment

true gangsta grandpa

A fairly elderly man – yet prolific graffiti artist- spends the later days of life pasting collage artwork out of portrait photography on the streets of his Brooklyn neighborhood.

And this OG isn’t doing this for money, or to be ‘cool’ with the ‘kids these days’ – but because it’s something which brings him a lot of satisfaction – as natural to him as breathing. Continue reading


Leave a comment

Bodybuilders’ World « surreal photography by Kurt Stallaert


belgian photographer kurt stallaert has conceived a series of hyper-realistic images entitled ‘bodybuilder’s world’. the personal project suggests an imaginary world with a literal ‘powerful twist’. at first glance the subjects look ordinary in their daily surroundings, but on closer inspection they have been augmented to look like avid members of the professional fitness sport. the faces of the individuals, often those of children, are attached to the superhuman trunk of a bodybuilder generating a peculiar sense of curiosity, particularly within the everyday life setting.





www.kurtstallaert.com

Berlin based photographer Malte Pietschmann: If India was a Movie

1 Comment

 

“If india was a movie” ist als freies Projekt in Nord-Indien (genauer Himachal Pradesh und Jammu & Kashmir) entstanden. Nachdem bereits zahlreiche Arbeiten und Serien umgesetzt wurden, die das indische Leben und die dortigen kulturellen Unterschiede und Kontraste beleuchten, beschäftigt sich “If india was a movie” mit der Fragestellung wie vergleichbare Arbeiten aussähen, wenn jedes Portrait ein eigenständiges Filmplakat wäre.”        –DMIG

www.maltepietschmann.com

 

Infra « Images from the Congo by Richard Mosse

Leave a comment

“They say that Napoleon was colourblind & blood for him as green as grass.”

– from Unrecounted by WG Sebald

For centuries, the Congo has compelled and defied the Western imagination. Richard Mosse brings to this subject the use of a discontinued military surveillance technology, a type of color infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome. Originally developed for camouflage detection, this aerial reconnaissance film registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, rendering the green landscape in vivid hues of lavender, crimson, and hot pink.

Infrared film also found civilian uses among cartographers, agronomists, hydrologists, and archaeologists, to reveal subtle changes in the landscape. In the late 1960s, the medium was appropriated in the cover art of albums by rock musicians like Jimi Hendrix or the Grateful Dead, trickling into the popular imagination as the palette of psychedelic (from the Greek for “soul-manifesting”) experience, eventually accumulating a kitsch aesthetic.
On his journeys in eastern Congo, Mosse photographed rebel groups of constantly switching allegiances, fighting nomadically in a jungle war zone plagued by frequent ambushes, massacres, and systematic sexual violence. These tragic narratives urgently need telling but cannot be easily described. Like Joseph Conrad a century before him, Mosse discovered a disorienting and ineffable conflict situation, so trenchantly real that it verges on the abstract, at the limits of description.
In his extraordinary series of essays on Africa, The Shadow of the Sun, Ryszard Kapuściński reminds us that “The richness of every European language is a richness in ability to describe its own culture, represent its own world. When it ventures to do the same for another culture, however, it betrays its limitations, underdevelopment, semantic weakness.”
Infra offers a radical rethinking of how to depict a conflict as complex and intractable as that of the ongoing war in the Congo. The results offer a fevered inflation of the traditional reportage document, underlining the tension between art, fiction, and photojournalism. Infra initiates a dialogue with photography that begins as an intoxicating meditation on a broken documentary genre, but ends as a haunting elegy for a vividly beautiful land touched by unspeakable tragedy.
Richard Mosse (born 1980, Ireland) is a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship 2011, with a generous supplemental stipend from the Leon Levy Foundation. Mosse, currently based in New York, earned an MFA in Photography from Yale School of Art in 2008 and a Postgraduate Diploma in Fine Art from Goldsmiths, London, in 2005. He will have solo exhibitions at the Weatherspoon Art Museum, North Carolina, and the Savannah College of Art and Design, Hong Kong, in January, 2012. Infra was included in Dublin Contemporary 2011 and will be shown in solo exhibitions at Open Eye, Liverpool and Belfast Exposed in 2012. Mosse has exhibited work at Tate Modern, London, the Akademie der Künste, Berlin, Kunsthalle Munich, among others. Mosse’s public collections include the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, the Martin Z. Margulies Collection, Miami, the Musée de l’Élysée, Lausanne, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, and the Nelson Atkins Museum, Kansas City. In 2012, Mosse will begin a residency at Künstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin.  -text via Jack Shainman Gallery

Smoke « A series of portrait photography by Miki Takahashi

3 Comments

all photos © miki takahashi