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10 Moleskine Journals From Some Of The Most Interesting Creatives Alive

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Despite the ever-encroaching digital world, the popularity of Moleskine, those utterly dignified black notebooks that can be carried in your pocket, seems to only have increased. The many 20th-century cultural heroes who carried Moleskines, from Oscar Wilde to Pablo Picasso, have lent the brand an aura of creative genius.

But this winter, Moleskine is bolstering its 21st-century cred with the publication of The Detour Book, a collection of the creative journals of present-day artists, designers, and writers. Noted by Brain Pickings’ Maria Popova last week, The Detour Book sounds like one of those tomes that deserves to be poured over:

Scattered across the pages of The Detour Book are the images of over 250 notebooks decorated, hacked, and filled with intimate sketches and drawings by some of the world’s most celebrated creative professionals; among them architects, designers, film directors and musicians including Spike Jonze, Sigur Ros, Mary Ellen Mark and Karim Rashid, to name a few.

There are funny little cartoons from Dave Eggers and brilliant sketches from Toyo Ito, which show the Mikimoto building taking over Ginza. Each book is its own unique archive, preserving the struggle to bring a spark of an idea to fruition.

What’s interesting about the collection is that most people don’t use Moleskines as traditional sketchbooks at all. Instead, designers like Tord Boontje have used them as 3-D objects, slicing through their eggshell pages and hacking them into study models. ATELYE 70, the Turkish architecture studio, turned the fold-out pages of a Moleskine Pocket Accordion into an actual architectural model, inserting plexiglass staircases and scale models between the folds.  http://bit.ly/V8wi6W

 

The Detour Book is one of those rare pieces of marketing that rewards a company and the consumer equally. It’s marvelously fun reading. And who can blame Moleskine for being proud?  Buy your copy here

This gallery contains 10 photos


diane arbus atley « photography by matthias heiderich



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Düsseldorf // Container Architecture

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

In recent years the big LEGO-like boxed containers are not only limited to being seen at sea ports; architects have brought them to mainland and adapted for them a variety of uses ranging from high-rise apartment blocks in Melbourne and student housing in Canberra to the Guzman Penthouse addition in Manhattan.
 

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

Berlin – June 2011, the NRW-Forum Düsseldorf, invited renowned architects, designers, and artists from around the world to submit designs for container architecture.  With an overwhelming response, and with new and already existing designs, the models were reconstructed on a scale of 1:5 for the Container Architecture Exhibition.  More than 100 designs were submitted for consideration and every one of them will be included in a frieze of pictures running around the walls of the exhibition space; 24 were reconstructed, the tallest scaled model pierces the museum’s ceiling.
 

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

But what triggered the creation of this exhibition; why containers?  In the globalization era containers are seen as a symbol to forecast the whereabouts of the economy; empty container ships indicate a downturn; fully loaded container ships—or orders for new, even bigger ships—are euphoriant symbols of better times.  However, the Container Architecture Exhibition honors the significance of the empty container which offers diverse possibilities.  According to exhibition organizer Werner Lippert, ‘containers are a symbol of the way we live and dwell in our globalized, mobile, nomadic age,’ and also quoted ethnologist Hartmut Böhme, who described the container as a ‘fetish of the modern age’ that stands for cataclysm, mobility, and change.’  However, a container is more than that; it is the building type of the future; the addition, the new urban object of modern architecture.

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

Originally used nearly 60 years ago in ships as a method of standardized shipping, containers remain a hugely popular means of transporting goods around the globe.  The container itself, which is 2.44 meters wide, 2.59 meters high, and either 6.06 or 12.192 meters long, has been the globally standardized transportation unit since 1956.Thirty million of them can be found on the seas and oceans of the world. Today, the container is also a foundation of allure for numerous architects as they create entire student residences, prize-winning homes, and cruise terminals. They are perched as penthouses on New York rooftops or as parasitic architectural works on the roofscape of San Francisco. Piled on top of each other to create residential buildings in London or high-rise apartment blocks in Melbourne; designers are transforming them into mobile homes or stunning holiday homes.  As a micro-house, as a building that can provide accommodation at short notice when homes are in short supply or during catastrophes, as a temporary building, as a travelling brand store.  Such as Puma City which has travelled around the world.  Furthermore, they are used in art as a walk-in sculpture that doubles as a bridge over a river. 

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

Identical, robust, stackable, inexpensive and available all over the world containers are easy to erect and dismantle, sustainable and much more…  The Düsseldorf exhibit leaves no doubt that, with some imaginative effort, an empty shipping container can be much more than a symbol of a struggling or a prolific economy.  The Container Architecture exhibit, highlights the creative potential of the container and its unique ability to serve eclectic contemporary lifestyles.  It is no wonder, therefore, that architects, designers, and artists in all four corners of the globe are excited by what containers have to offer.  The ‘Container Architecture’ exhibition at the NRW-Forum Düsseldorf aims to offer a fascinating overview of what is possible.  … In short, the container is an idea with a promising future.  To coincide with the exhibition, the Chamber of Architects in NRW will be organizing a series of lectures on containers and architecture by renowned experts. 

The exhibition is supported by the Ministry of Economics, Energy, Building, Housing, and Transport of the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and by the Initiative Stadtbaukultur (Urban Building Culture Initiative).

 

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

June 8, 2011 – September 4, 2011
NRW-Forum Kultur und Wirtschaft
Ehrenhof 2, 40479 Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf

photo © NRW-Forum Düsseldorf


The Geometry of God // Striking Kaleidoscopic Patterns of European Cathedral Ceilings

Photographer David Stephenson captures architectural triumphs at the intersection of art and mathematics.

If you’ve ever set foot in one of Europe’s Gothic or Romanesque cathedrals and looked up, you likely found yourself spellbound by the striking vaulted ceilings. If you haven’t, photographer David Stephenson allows you to do so vicariously with his Heavenly Vaultsproject — a series of magnificent kaleidoscopic photos that capture the singular blend of ethereal magic and patterned precision in these architectural triumphs at the intersection of art and mathematics, flattening the vaulted ceilings and distilling them to their essential shapes, recurring fractal-like patterns, and intricate detailing.

Many of these structures, particularly the Gothic cathedrals, were constructed in an era actively occupied with ordering the heavens and expressed in their mathematical nature was a microcosm model of the universe — perhaps a paradoxical proposition that rationality and logic could explain or convey the might of God to which these temples of worship aimed to attest.

Heavenly Vaults is a follow-up to Stephenson’s 2005 book, Visions of Heaven: The Dome in European Architecture

Sources: , David Stephenson


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Rare Architecture: The Town Hall Hotel

photo © Sue Barr

photo © Sue Barr

This Edwardian Grade II listed building was erected in 1910 and then considerably extended in 1937. Now an 8,900sqm project, we can easily say that the East End has never seen anything like this before. The brief by Singaporean hotelier Peng Loh was to create a contemporary luxury hotel to sit sympathetically within the existing building (the old Bethnal Green Town Hall, at the heart of London’s burgeoning East End), restore it and also add to its volume with an extension. We’re not sure as to whether the extension fits in ‘sympathetically’ but rare architects certainly gave it their all. Rare architectsMichel da Costa Gonçalves and Nathalie Rozencwajg saw the project as the building’s third age, after the 1910 and 1937 phases.

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

The Town Hall Hotel is wrapped entirely by a laser cut powder coated aluminium skin, no windows or doors are externally visible. This pattern, which clearly separates the extension from the existing construction, was selected from a pattern book developed by the architects especially for this project. The inspiration was derived from an original art deco feature in the Council Chamber, which makes the design process so much more meaningful and respectful to the buildings prior architectural elements. However, the architects from Rare did not stop there, as the pattern book also consisted of designs with a similar historical background regarding the radiator & air-condition covers together with wall panels and much more. This is an approach, which we are always admirable of and respect the process behind the finished product in greater depth. Suffice to say that with projects such as these, it is great to see architects taking a step back before moving forwards. With regards to the shape of the extension’s skin and roof, this was dictated by light and views that had to be maintained for neighbouring buildings.

Once inside, you get to see the combination of the complete restoration of the original detailing with the introduction of modern glazed partitions and loose furniture items. This restored detailing was realised by highly skilled craftsmen who brought the interiors back to their original glory. With features such as ornate moulded ceilings, wooden panelling, dado rails and decorative skirting, the constructive shell has such great importance that the ‘less permanent’ structures have been left simplistic and light in order to appreciate the historical surroundings. Glazing played a primal role in the interiors giving onlookers  the ability to see through all the existing spaces while at the same time creating an almost dropped like boxed element clearly dictating the language of the new build. The new solid partitions are solely white in colour and are only present where absolutely necessary in order to maintain the multitude of viewpoints.

photo © Ed Reeve

In the bedrooms, the pod designs are custom made and strongly apparent raising the new structure from floor level to make the separation between old and new. These modules are simplistic with clean lines and a stark white pallet blending within the interior. The sizes of these 98 rooms may vary but the design philosophy is the same. The overall feeling you get as a guest is something very exclusive. By incorporating simplicity into the new features the guest feels privileged to be in a building with such character, which almost has a museum like effect. Now combine the adoration of a museum to a hotel bedroom and that’s where you have exclusivity.

photo © Edmund Sumner

photo © Edmund Sumner

 

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Edmund Sumner

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Ed Reeve

photo © Calvin Chua

photo © Calvin Chua

photo © Sue Barr

photo © Sue Barr

photo © Edmund Sumner


Boros Residence by Jens Casper

Freunde von Freunden – Karen & Christian Boros

In the Boros residence – a former Second World War air raid shelter built in 1942 in central Berlin – visitors can easily lose their way in the maze-like corridors of bare concrete.

Bullet holes from the Second World War testify the historical significance of the building. The heart of this hermetic concrete cube contains an exhibition of contemporary works from the private collection of ad agency founder and publisher, Christian Boros. In order to create a suitable space for the collection, architect Jens Casper deconstructed the 3,000 square meter bunker, which was once devoid of natural light, transforming it into a complex room arrangement. The glass superstructure of the penthouse is the polar opposite of the cube’s massiness.

There, Christian and his wife, Karen, live with their son amidst paintings by Elizabeth Peyton and a series of installations by groundbreaking artists such as Olafur Eliasson. It is a dream home that once seemed impossible to realize, but has now become an art manifesto for Berlin’s historical Mitte district, where change is the norm.

Boros Residence, by Jens Casper, for Karen and Christian Boros, Manager and Art Collector, Penthouse, Berlin-Mitte, via: Freunde von Freunden


Furnish: Furniture and Interior Design for the 21st Century

Furnish, Furniture and Interior Design for the 21st Century
Furnish presents furniture and rooms that are redefining our current understanding of furnishings and interior design. The book documents and puts into context recent work by designers, artists and architects who are creating and using furniture in pioneering ways. The experimental objects and spaces documented in Furnish are not only a sure indicator of the trends that will be influencing interiors for the next few years, but they also serve as innovative examples of interdisciplinary design work that are inspiring for anyone working creatively.